How To Skip Stones – Like A Pro – on the Upper Nantahala River

Sure! I hike…a lot. It’s a means of getting from point A to point B; from the trailhead to a waterfall or maybe to a gorgeous mountain view.

There are times when I push hard to make miles. And sometimes, when I follow a whim or find some magical place in the woods, I’ll simply sit on a log, quietly contemplating, or explore the immediate vicinity, or play in a stream. No desire whatsoever to make miles. Just be.

Hiking isn’t always about trails, packs, and putting one foot in front of the other – for me, at least. I don’t need a destination to go for a hike. Hiking, as cliche as it sounds, is as much about the things you see and do while you’re walking as it is about getting somewhere.

Recently, I came across a rocky beach and a stretch of calm water on the Upper Nantahala River within Standing Indian. I fully intended to hike, but…there were round, flat stones everywhere and the water was like glass. I couldn’t pass this up! Could you?!

I love skipping stones. Always have. It’s definitely NOT something I’ve out grown – or ever will. It’s an…hmm…art form. Yeah. Or…maybe an exercise in mindfulness. It’s definitely meditative. Mm hmm! That’s it! It’s a meditative art.

Just the mere act of winding up for the throw and letting a stone fly across the water and all is right in the world, like when you were a kid. No cares. No worries. No thoughts. Just you and the ripples on the water.

Talk about relaxing?!

You should try it sometime. Or, maybe pick it back up again if you’ve lost touch with your inner rock skipper. I’m sure you’ll find it very therapeutic as well.

And here! This will help get you started – a quick tutorial on skipping stones. I say, “Go for it!”

How many skips can you get?

See ya’ on the trail!

Kimsey Creek Crossings – Water, Water, Everywhere!

By and far, Kimsey Creek Trail offers the most diverse and dramatic landscapes within the

A fallen tree over the falls on Kimsey Creek.

Though tempting, this is NOT one of the recommended crossings over Kimsey Creek.

Standing Indian Basin. And water. Lots of water!

There’s water beside the trail, on the trail, across the trail, over the trail, under the trail, through the trail, running, pooling, trickling, splashing, sploshing and laughing. Oh, yes! It laughs at you at times as you try and keep your shoes dry.

But it’s all part of the charm, character, and personality of the trail. In fact, I wouldn’t want it any other way.

So, whether you walk right through the water, step across stones and logs, or perambulate over one of the many bridges, Kimsey Creek Trail in the Standing Indian Basin has a crossing for you.

Here are just a few you’ll encounter….

A feeder branch which flows into Kimsey Creek.

By the time you’re done you will have crossed dozens of these littler feeder branches to Kimsey Creek.

Nicely tucked within the thick rhododendron, a foot bridge crosses Kimsey Creek.

Looking downstream through the thick rhododendron at the first Kimsey Creek bridge.

The incredible blue blazed trail along the beautiful Kimsey Creek.

Paralleling the creek most of the way, Kimsey Creek Trail is filled with springs and low spots that never seem to dry out.

 

Water flowing down the middle of Kimsey Creek Trail.

Depending on the time of year, water occasionally flows down the middle of the trail, adding to the fun of hiking Kimsey Creek Trail.

Another foot bridge on Kimsey Creek Trail.

This is one of the many bold streams that feed into Kimsey Creek. As you will see, not all of them have bridges.

 

Weathered and well-trodden, this bridge crosses a feeder branch of Kimsey Creek.

Another view of the weathered, well-trodden bridge from the previous photo.

Though it may not look it, this bridge is strong and sturdy...and a great place to sit and look at the falls on Kimsey Creek.

Not only a great place to cross Kimsey Creek, it’s also a great place to sit and look at the falls. (And don’t let the missing planks intimidate you. It’s a sturdy bridge.)

 

Necessity has prompted many hikers to build makeshift bridges along Kimsey Creek Trail.

Made by trail maintainers or by hikers themselves, logs and strategically placed rocks assist hikers at many crossings and wet spots along Kimsey Creek Trail.

 

Never needing a bridge, my hiking buddy, Phyto, loves playing in the water along Kimsey Creek.

My hiking buddy, Phyto, never uses a bridge to cross Kimsey Creek. Lucky dog!

 

One of several bold streams that feed into Kimsey Creek, offering a nice spot to soak your feet.

Funny how the widest feeder stream doesn’t have a bridge. No worries! There’s a narrow spot just upstream that most people can jump…or get wet trying.

After passing through so much water, this is the last year-round feeder branch that flows into Kimsey Creek.

This is it! The trail heads uphill away from Kimsey Creek and water becomes somewhat scarce…unless you’re caught in a rainstorm, which is frequent in this part of the Nantahala Mountains.

So…you get the picture?! (See what I did there?) Kimsey Creek Trail is beautiful, full of gorgeous scenery, and wet, but wet in a good sort of way.

Take a hike, splash in the creek, or soak your feet. You can’t go wrong, anytime of the year, on Kimsey Creek Trail.

See ya’ on the trail!

 

Where In The Blue Blazes?

A snail slithering along the blue blazed Long Branch Trail.

Even snails use blue blaze trails.

To find your GAME* you can follow a blaze
that leads from south to north.
Or turn it around for a MEGA* trip
and follow it back to forth.

For this blaze of white makes one long line
for hikers of all types;
through tunnels of green, past waterfalls
and many beautiful sights.

But veer from the path, and you often will,
for water, rest, or ride,
there’s another blaze that you will need
whose importance we cannot hide

Nature encroaching on a blue blaze along Park Creek Trail.

Nature attempting to turn a blue blaze green.

Though not as famous as the white
this blue one is your friend.
It’ll be there in your hour of need
and follow you ‘til the end.

It’ll guide you to a warm, dry shelter
whenever you need to rest.
Or on a tangent to a view
that’s arguably the best.

And there for you when weather gets bad
an alternate route’s okay;
to lead you ‘round a mountain top
and safe from danger’s way

A source of information, this double blue blaze indicates a right turn in the trail.

This double blue blaze is indicating a right turn in the trail.

So never discount the power of blue
when hiking on the trail.
It’s just as important as the white
though certainly not as pale.

~Michael Byrd

See ya’ on the trail!

*GAME is an acronym for an AT thru-hike that goes from Georgia to Maine or Northbound and MEGA is for a Southbound trip from Maine to Georgia.

Earth Day Yoga Hike to Standing Indian Mountain

What could be better?! The day was clear and blue. The temperature was crisp and refreshing. And a gusty wind carried the scent of Spring in the air.

Hiking to Standing Indian Mountain for an Earth Day 2015 Yoga class.Earth Day 2015!! We were so fortunate this year. The weather around the mountains of western North Carolina is rather unpredictable in April; 70 degrees one day and snowing the next, but this Earth Day was the best one in recent memory.

And what better way to celebrate it than having a Yoga class on top of Standing Indian Mountain in the Nantahala National Forest?

Eight of us intrepid Yogis strapped on our day packs, filled with water and snacks, and hiked the 2.5 miles on the Appalachian Trail from Deep Gap to Standing Indian Mountain. It was a crowded day on the trail, filled with AT section hikers and thru-hikers making their way northbound. I counted 23 in all!Backwoods AT sign for the blue blazed trail to the top of Standing Indian Mountain.

Imagine their surprise when they stepped off the short blue blaze trail and into the small opening on Standing Indian with a bunch of yogis striking poses…and OM’ing? But that’s another story.

It took just over an hour to reach the top of the mountain. We weren’t in a rush; we had all day. Two of our Yogi’s, Bill and Sharon, being past presidents of the Nantahala Hiking Club, regaled us with AT stories, trail history, and an ongoing seminar on spring wildflowers. Very informative!

Stopping along the AT for a rest and a brief history lesson.And, Jean, a member of the Franklin Bird Club, offered her keen ear to help identify the calls of all the birds we could hear, but as nature would have that day, couldn’t see.

All in all, it was an amazing Earth Day watching Mother Nature awaken and start to redecorate her woodland mantle, with spring wildflowers.

Having the theme of Earth Day, our Yoga class consisted mostly of partner Yoga poses. Everyone was invited to explore their partnership with Mother Earth as they learned Yoga poses that relied on another person. Each pose honoring and expressing gratitude for all the things on Earth we take for granted.Holding Virabhadrasana I, or Warrior One Pose, atop Standing Indian Mountain, Earth Day 2015.

We finished our Yoga class back to back with our partners in a seated meditation. As we quieted our minds and our hearts, I invited everyone to see if they could sync their breath with their partner. Once they had accomplished this, I invited them to sync their rhythmic breath with the rhythm of their other partner, Mother Earth, as we gently sat on her shoulders.

Something magical happened on top of Standing Indian. After about 5 minutes of meditation there was a pause – a pause in the howling wind, a pause in the song of the birds, a pause in the Earth. For about 15 seconds nothing moved, nothing was making a sound. It was the quietest moment I’ve ever experienced.

Learning to work as a partner in Uktanasana, or Chair Pose.You could feel the stillness. You could touch the stillness. In that one moment we were connected to each other, to the Earth, and to something bigger than any of us collectively.

The whole purpose of Yoga is to connect to this Oneness and, speaking for myself, I’ve never felt anything like this before. Was it the day? Was it the people? Was it our intention? Was it being on the proverbial mountain top?

Or, maybe it was just a coincidence.

Who knows?! But…it happened.

Enjoying the view from Standing Indian on Earth Day 2015.

Though a little chilly, the sky was clear, the sun was out, and the view was amazing on Earth Day 2015.

And none of us will soon forget this experience. That’s for sure! And all the way back we talked about making this an annual thing; The Earth Day Yoga Hike.

Maybe you can join us next year? Or, if Earth Day doesn’t work for you, I’d be happy to lead you and your group on a Yoga Hike to Standing Indian or any other mountain top in western North Carolina. Think about. And let me know. Namaste.

See ya on the trail!

You’ve Gotta Hike Kimsey Creek Trail

One of the many waterfalls on Kimsey Creek.

One of the many waterfalls on Kimsey Creek.

I really am fortunate. Living so close to Standing Indian – and all the wonderful trails it has to offer – is, well, the best thing in the world. Really! It’s a hiker’s paradise!

I could write thousands of blog posts about it and post umpteen million beautiful photos, but it’s not the same as seeing this place for yourself.

I suppose I could – or should – leave it at that. Visit Standing Indian – period! But then this would become a very dull blog. And besides, you’d never get to read about Kimsey Creek Trail…which…you’d be better off experiencing personally rather than reading about it. But…then…well…oh!

Ok! Enough. You get the picture. You’re here. You might as well read about Kimsey Creek Trail. Then you can decide if you’d like to see it for yourself…or not. I don’t know why you wouldn’t. It’s, by far, one of my favorite trails in the Standing Indian Basin.

And like many of the the trails in Standing Indian, you can pick up the Kimsey Creek Trail at the Backcountry Information Center. Just follow the signs to the junction of Kimsey Creek Trail and the Park Ridge/Park Creek loop and turn left. You’re ready to hike Kimsey Creek.

Trail sign at the Backcountry INfo Center.Another trail sign after passing through Standing Indian Campground.Trail marker for the blue blazed Kimsey Creek Trail.

The Magic Begins

There are only a couple of steep, short inclines on the Kimsey Creek Trail and you’ll be glad to know you’re getting one of them out of the way right at the beginning. It’s not a long incline but it will elevate your heart rate, depending on what kind of shape you’re in.

As it switches back on itself and winds up the hill, you will soon find yourself walking along the Standing Indian Campground and past the outdoor amphitheater. Further on, the path descends to an old forest service road, where you’ll look down on the large group campsites, a great place for groups up to 50 campers (reservations required).

Old Forest Service Road that doubles as the path for Kimsey Creek Trail.One of the many wild flowers found along Kimsey Creek Trail.A blue blazed tree next to one of the many gates in Standing Indian, used to keep vehicles off footpaths.

 

 

 

 

In my opinion, this old forest service road, which you’ll be on for a couple of miles, is one of the many things that makes Kimsey Creek Trail so enjoyable. This wide, scenic walk along Kimsey Creek is rather deceiving. You don’t even realize you’re gradually going uphill the whole way.

Many people will follow this section out until the path narrows again and then turn around for a short, 4 mile, out and back hike. And if this is all you end up doing, it’ll still be one of the most memorable hikes you’ve ever taken.

This section is punctuated by many water crossings, springs, and feeder streams for Kimsey Creek. So many, in fact, that it’s sometimes hard to tell the difference between the creek and the trail. But don’t let this dissuade you! Yes. Kimsey Creek Trail is a wet trail. But it’s fun hopping from rock to rock – especially with hiking poles – or you can tramp right through the wet spots like an old pro if you want. And kids LOVE this section because of all the water.

Kimsey Creek Trail is well marked with blue blazes and rustic signs.Fallen trees look like bridges over Kimsey Creek.Besides hiking, fishing for trout is another favorite pastime on Kimsey Creek.There are also many places along Kimsey Creek where you can stop to rest, sit on a rock, or even fish for trout (though the old timers may not like me giving away their secret spots).

Waterfalls and Falling Waters

As you follow the well marked blue blazed trail, you’ll come to a small bridge where the road ends and the single lane path picks up again. The first thing you’ll see when you cross the bridge is one of many backcountry campsites along Kimsey Creek Trail. You can’t reserve these, and sometimes they’re overgrown with raspberry canes, but if you do decide to camp in one of these places remember to practice the Leave No Trace principles.

Kimsey Creek Trail narrows as it approaches a backcountry campsite.There are many creek and stream crossings on Kimsey Creek - some have bridges, some don't.One of several open meadows often used for backcountry camping along Kimsey Creek Trail.

 

 

 

 

I love this section of the trail! It passes through a narrow ravine as it continues to meander along Kimsey Creek. There are several small, picturesque waterfalls, a rickety, but safe, bridge, and great places to meditate with the sound of running water dominating your senses.

And, the temperature?! Wow! Is it cool through this section – anytime of year. It’s like being in an air conditioned forest in the summer. It can be 80 degrees in Franklin, but only 65 degrees along this part of the creek. In the winter and through early spring, it’s not uncommon to see huge icicles hanging from the rock faces along the creek. And, with full leaf coverage, it almost appears to be dusk most of the day throughout this section.

It's very calming to rest at one of the water falls on Kimsey Creek Trail.This section of Kimsey Creek Trail is full of wonderful waterfalls.Sit and meditate and see where the magic of the waterfalls on Kimsey Creek take you.

 

 

 

 

It really is magical! And if you don’t go any farther than this on the trail, you’ve had a great hike. Seriously!

The second distinct incline in the trail marks the end of this section. The path climbs up and away from the creek, winding around small swales and ridges, hopping feeder streams, and past some rather large trees. Dappled sunlight makes another appearance as the ridge rises and though the canopy is thick in the summer, you may get a glimpse of blue sky letting you know it’s still daylight.

Kimsey Creek Canyon – Unofficially Speaking

Eventually you’ll come to a blue blazed tree, which looks like it has very long legs. It reminds me of the Tree Ents from Lord of the Rings. You get the feeling like it just might walk through the fern-carpeted forest at night and return to the exact same spot as the sun rises. Haha! I’m sure it doesn’t, but, then again, I haven’t spent the night at this spot to know for certain.

The trail drops sharply here and rejoins Kimsey Creek. I call this section of the trail Kimsey Creek Canyon. Oh, no! That’s not its official name. I made it up. It’s not on any cartographer’s maps. But you’re deep…well below the canopy, surrounded by steeply rising ridges, and dwarfed by the mountain tops. Often times, though you don’t feel it before or after this section, the wind roars through here as if it were the only passage it has through the mountains.

Kimsey Creek Trail meanders away from the creek as it crosses this boulder.Besides being interesting tree, this blue blazed tree marks a new section of the Kimsey Creek trail.Carpeted in ferns, this section of the Kimsey Creek trail climbs towards Deep Gap.

 

 

 

 

It’s not like the Grand Canyon, mind you, with sheer cliffs on either side. No. These mountains are much older, softer, worn down by time and weather. In the winter, when the leaves are gone and you can see the contour of the land around you, the canyon-like quality really shows. And the way the land opens up as you come out of this section, heading toward Deep Gap, almost gives the impression, geologically speaking, that there may have been a land bridge or ice dam many thousands of years ago, which eventually gave way to what is now Kimsey Creek, forming the Kimsey Creek Canyon.

Who knows?! But it sure if fun looking at the land and speculating on the history and the forces of nature that shape it.

The Final Accent

As the trail continues, it’s time to say goodbye to Kimsey Creek. The path begins its last ascent towards Deep Gap. There are a couple of short climbs, but overall the trail still has a fairly gradual grade, compared to other trails in Standing Indian.

The upper meadow along Kimsey Creek Trail and USFS 71.USFS Road 71 connecting HWY 64 with Deep Gap.The end of Kimsey Creek Trail- or the beginning if you're coming down from the Appalachian Trail.When you average the elevation gain over the entire distance of the trail it’s only about 250 feet per mile. Very easy! I think the reason why the trail is listed as “moderately difficult” is because of all the water crossings, rocks, and roots you have to contend with – not the elevation gain.

Anyway, soon you will come to a large meadow adjacent to a gravel parking lot, which is accessed by US Forest Service Road 71. (Please note: USFS 71 is only open spring through fall. Check with the local Nantahal Ranger Station (nantahalard@fs.fed.us) for opening and closing dates.)

USFS 71, a six mile long, one lane, gravel road with turnouts, connects U.S. Hwy 64 with Deep Gap. Deep Gap (elev 4341) is the terminus of the Kimsey Creek Trail, trailhead for the Deep Gap Branch Trail, and a popular waypoint on the Appalachian Trail for weekenders and AT section hikers.

The Appalachian Trail heading northbound from Deep Gap to Standing Indian Mtn.The Appalachian Trail heading southbound from Deep Gap to Chunky Gal Trail.The trailhead for Deep Gap Branch Trail that leads to GA.You’ll always find cars in the various parking lots at the end of Kimsey Creek Trail. In fact, certain times of the year this area gets quite crowded. For example, in April you’ll be hard pressed finding solitude amongst all the section hikers, thru-hikers, and the people gathering ramps, a pungent, wild onion,considered a delicacy by many, that grows rampant in this area. And, of course, again in the fall when all the leaf lookers come out for our colorful fall display.

A map showing Kimsey Creek Trail, the Appalachian Trail and Lower Ridge Trail.

Kimsey Creek Trail is marked as 23 and Lower Ridge Trail is marked as 28. The dotted line highlighted in orange is the Appalachian Trail. (Trails Illustrated Map, National Geographic)

How’s It Go Again? Oh, Right? Just Do It!

Kimsey Creek Trail is a great out-and-back hike that’s available year round from the Backcountry Info Center at Standing Indian. It’s also part of a very popular loop trail (Kimsey Creek Trail/Appalachian Trail/Lower Ridge Trail – 11 miles in total) that makes for a great, but long, day hike or a wonderful weekend backpacking trip.

BUT – and this is a big but since this is a very important Public Service Announcement – if you decide to do the loop, I strongly recommend starting with Kimsey Creek Trail first. The Lower Ridge Trail, beautiful and scenic as it may be, is quite steep in parts and is MUCH better to come down, than to go up. Believe me!

So! If you’ve made it this far, after reading all these words, I hope you realize that you really need to experience this trail for yourself – more than once and at different times of the year.

My trail buddy, Phyto, gives his seal of approval for Kimsey Creek Trail.There’s magic in discovering the beauty of a trail for the first time and Kimsey Creek Trail will easily feel like a new experience every time you hike it. So…hike it! And let me know what you think about it in the comments section.

Trail at a glance
Mileage: 4.1 miles one way to Deep Gap
Elevation change: Approx 1000ft from Backcountry Info Center to Deep Gap
Water sources: Springs/Streams
Trailhead: Park at the Backcountry Info Center at Standing Indian and follow the signs for Kimsey Creek Trail.

Would You Rather Kiss Miley Cyrus On The Lips OR Hike Kimsey Creek Trail?

Forest Service sign marking the trail head for Kimsey Creek Trail.Hiking with kids is always an adventure. If you don’t have kids you should consider renting some for a day and take them hiking…just for the experience.

You won’t regret it.

“I like downhills, Daddy. Does this trail have downhills?” asks my 13 year old daughter.

“When can we eat the trail mix, Dad?” inquires my 15 year old son.

“Guys! C’mon. We haven’t even gotten out of the car yet.” says their…wait! Haha! You thought I was going to reveal my age, didn’t you?

With kids, you’ll quickly discover no two hikes are ever the same.

Now if you’re thinking this is going to be an anti-kid hiking post, you need to know right now I adore my kids. They’re funny, adventurous, playful, and fully self-expressed in all the right ways.

And they love hiking! Well, most of the time, at least…except when we have to go uphill or we’ve run out of trail mix, which – both – happens more often than not.

But, they’re a busy bunch and getting busier as they get older. Finding a break in their schedule  to go hiking – and particularly a break that coincides with perfect weather – is getting as rare as an external frame pack.

Happy hiking kids!

The two monkeys on the right blessed me with their company for this hike.

The stars finally lined up – Mercury was no longer retrograde (as my friend is fond of pointing out), the weather was amazing and our two youngest kids were sitting around with nothing to do.

Imagine that?!

The thing about kids – and hiking – is no matter how old they are you still need to be flexible with your plans. It might not look like the hike you envisioned, but it’ll be fun…if you’re adaptable.

“My favorite thing about hiking, Daddy, is going downhill.”

“Say! How much trail mix did you bring, Dad?”

Being a rather impromptu hike, I didn’t have much time to plan it out. It was one of those, “Quick! Change your clothes, put on your boots, grab an apple and some water and let’s go,” kind of hikes. In situations like this I like to go on familiar trails. This way I know sort of what to expect.

I chose Kimsey Creek Trail at Standing Indian. At just over 4 miles from the Backcountry Info Center to the top at Deep Gap and the intersection with the Appalachian Trail, Kimsey Creek Trail is a very scenic and enjoyable hike.

“It does have downhills, doesn’t it, Daddy?”

“Did you put raisins in the trail mix this time, Dad?”

Trail mix with raisins, peanuts, pecans, and curried cashews.

GORP – Good Ol’ Raisins and Peanuts; aka Trail Mix.

It’s a relatively easy to moderate hike, with long grades, wide trails and plenty of beautiful landscapes and water. Water, water everywhere! And like many trails in Standing Indian, much of the water – for most of the year – runs right down the middle of the trail – an entertaining distraction for most kids.

Sometimes you’re left wondering which is the trail and which is the creek.

But don’t let the wet trails discourage you. Even in the wettest season, they’re still passable and it’s kind of fun hopping from rock to log to rock to railroad tie. Just be sure you have hiking poles or a walking stick to help you with your balance. You might also want to leave an extra pair of shoes and clothes in the car for the kids for the ride home.

I expected my son would have gotten his shoes wet, but not this time. It was my daughter, the one who likes going downhill, who soaked both of her shoes…numerous times.

Our two youngest kids are quite the comedy team, playing off each other like a non-stop Vaudevillian act. Think of Dean and Jerry, Harvey and Tim, Lucy and Ethel or even Gilligan and the Skipper and that’ll give you some idea of what it’s like being around them.

And they were in rare form today. We’ve always whiled away the time on the trail by playing games; word games, concentration games, whatever their hyper minds can think of. Today – my daughter’s choice – we were playing “Would you rather…?”

It’s a simple game. Everyone takes turns asking someone a question like, “Would you rather be stuck in a submarine with Justin Bieber OR eat a plate full of greasy, grimy gopher guts?” (No animals were harmed in this game. Jussayin.) So, as you can see, the object of the game is to trap people in a no-win choice…or if you’re good, an embarrassing choice.

How embarrassing can it get? Pretty bad sometimes, especially when two young teenagers are trying to embarrass or gross out the other one.

Sun rays and sparkling water at Kimsey Creek Falls.

The falls on Kimsey Creek – this is as far as we got it today.

“Did I ever tell you how much I like going downhill, Daddy?”

“Can I finish the rest of the trail mix myself, Dad?”

We didn’t get very far on the trail today – maybe a couple of miles. And that’s Ok. We had fun! Lots of fun! AND…we established that my daughter likes hiking downhill, not uphill, and that my son is always hungry. Come to think of it! I didn’t get any trail mix today.

And, in spite of their constant attempts to trap me into an embarrassing situation, it was determined that I’d rather hike Kimsey Creek Trail – or any trail – than kiss Miley Cyrus on the lips – or anywhere for that matter. Yuck!! Sorry, Miley.

How do you keep your kids entertained and engaged while you’re on a family hike? I’d love to hear your thoughts in the comments below.

See ya on the trail!