Living On The Bartram Trail

I love where I live! I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again. It doesn’t get any better than this.

I’m a hiker. That’s no mystery! This blog is certainly evidence of this. So imagine my thrill when we moved to a house that is ON the Bartram Trail. In fact, we are sandwiched between the alternate “Canoe Route” and the “Hiking/Biking Route” on Section 3 of the Bartram Trail. This is the section between Buckeye Creek and Wallace Branch; or from Otto to Franklin, NC.

It’s not uncommon to see hikers passing our house on the road or paddling down the river in canoes and kayaks. And I wish I was going with each and every one of them.

The video below, which I shot in the evening, will give you a small taste of how amazing this section of the Bartram Trail really is.

Check this section of the Bartram out sometime! And if you happen by, don’t forget to wave or stop in for a rest.

See ya’ on the trail!

There’s A Bluebird On My Boulder

Well, two actually. Lucky us! We’ve had some bluebirds move into our birdhouse…and they’re nesting. Looks like we’re going to have baby birds this Spring.

So, I thought you might like to meet our new neighbors….

A male bluebird, perched on a cairn.

Mr. Bluebird is staking his claim and letting the Chickadees know this is his territory.

A female bluebird, perched on a cairn, carrying building materials into her new home.

Mrs. Bluebird is busying herself with domestic chores and nest building.

A bluebird poking her head out of her nesting box.

Mrs. Bluebird is taking in the view from her new home…and loving it!

A female bluebird takes flight from her new nesting box.

No time to waste! Mrs. Bluebird is off to find more nesting materials.

A female bluebird, perched on a cairn, surveying her new neighborhood.

Time to eat. Moments after this photo was snapped, Mrs. Bluebird swooped down and gobbled a tasty bug. (Well, I assume it was tasty.)

Baby bluebird peeking out of its nesting box.

And finally…six weeks later…baby bluebirds!!

We love sitting at our breakfast table, watching these bluebirds flying around our front yard. I’ve noticed it’s taking longer to finish our breakfast. But it’s so worth it!

Got bluebirds?! I’d love to hear about yours. Drop me a note in the comments section.

Standing Indian Campground

Let’s go camping?! Seriously! It’ll be fun. And there’s no better place than the Standing Indian Campground in the Nantahala National Forest of western North Carolina. (Some people might get upset that I’m letting you in on this secret.)

Situated 12 miles west of Franklin, NC off Highway 64, Standing Indian Campground, at the headwaters of the Nantahala River, offers 84 campsites and 3 group sites (for parties up to 25). Some sites are on a first-come, first-serve basis. Others you can reserve in advance.

A campsite at Standint Indian CampgroundRV site at Standing Indian CampgroundGroup Campsite at Standing Indian CampgroundEach site offers a picnic table, fire ring with grill, lantern post, and tent or camper pad. Fresh water spigots and clean restrooms with flush toilets (a must for our kids!) and showers are available throughout the campground. There’s even a dump station close by for RVs.

We’ve always had wonderful experiences at Standing Indian (open April 1 – October 31). Situated at 3800 feet elevation and surrounded by 5000 foot peaks, Standing Indian is a cool, refreshing place in the hottest of summers. And everywhere you go you can hear the calming sound of running water.

In our experience, everyone’s friendly, the “hosts” are always available and ready to assist you, and people respect quiet hours. There’s always the pleasant smell of campfires, our kids seem to make “best friends” quickly, and it’s very dark at night – VERY dark, which is a great change from all the light pollution we’re used to these days.

Camp Store at Standing Indian Campground.Day Use area at Standing Indian Campground.Information Kiosk at Standing Indian Campground.So Much To Do!

There’s never a dull moment at Standing Indian. The whole family can play in the river and creeks, skip stones, go rafting, tubing, or kayaking, and even fish for trout (license required). You can walk around the campground, ride your bikes, go for umpteen different hikes on world class trails, visit the Appalachian Trail, ride your horses, visit waterfalls, or enjoy the views from Standing Indian Mountain and Albert Mountain.

If this sounds like too much for you, you can always stay at your campsite, reading books, writing your memoir, playing cards, meditating, napping, or simply recuperating from your hectic city life. Ahhh! Doesn’t that sound good?!

Plenty of space for people to ride bikes, walk, and play at Standing Indian Campground.Wade, soak, float, or fish in the Upper Nantahala River at Standing Indian Campground.Ride your bike on the roads or play in the river at Standing Indian Campground.The surrounding area even offers many outstanding excursions within a short drive of Standing Indian. And if you should need groceries (more than the small camp store offers) or want a restaurant, Franklin is only 20 minutes away.

Whatever you decide to do, you can always cap the day off sitting around a campfire telling stories or reminiscing with friends and family.

Perfect for a short weekend or an extended stay (up to 14 days!), Standing Indian Campground is right in the heart of an outdoor paradise. I suggest you avoid holidays unless you’re able to reserve a site in advance. You can check availability or make reservations at

With 84 campsites to choose from, Standing Indian Campground has the perfect spot for you.Park an RV, pitch a tent, or hang a hammock at Standing Indian Campground.The perfect place to skip stones at Standing Indian Campground.So Let’s Go Camping!

I could wax poetic, like Emerson or Thoreau, about the virtues of reconnecting with nature, but that would be presumptuous of me to think I can do it better than them. No! Instead, I’m just going to say, “Go camping at Standing Indian!” Really. Just do it! And take the whole family with you. You won’t be sorry!

Ever been to Standing Indian? Tell us about your wonderful experience in the comment section below.


From the intersection of 441 and 64 W in Franklin, NC, drive west on 64/Murphy Road for 11.8 miles. Turn left on W. Old Murphy Road (sometimes shown on maps as Allison Creek Rd). Drive 1.9 miles and turn right on Forest Service Road 67. Drive an additional 1.9 miles to the Standing Indian Campground.

How To Skip Stones – Like A Pro – on the Upper Nantahala River

Sure! I hike…a lot. It’s a means of getting from point A to point B; from the trailhead to a waterfall or maybe to a gorgeous mountain view.

There are times when I push hard to make miles. And sometimes, when I follow a whim or find some magical place in the woods, I’ll simply sit on a log, quietly contemplating, or explore the immediate vicinity, or play in a stream. No desire whatsoever to make miles. Just be.

Hiking isn’t always about trails, packs, and putting one foot in front of the other – for me, at least. I don’t need a destination to go for a hike. Hiking, as cliche as it sounds, is as much about the things you see and do while you’re walking as it is about getting somewhere.

Recently, I came across a rocky beach and a stretch of calm water on the Upper Nantahala River within Standing Indian. I fully intended to hike, but…there were round, flat stones everywhere and the water was like glass. I couldn’t pass this up! Could you?!

I love skipping stones. Always have. It’s definitely NOT something I’ve out grown – or ever will. It’s an…hmm…art form. Yeah. Or…maybe an exercise in mindfulness. It’s definitely meditative. Mm hmm! That’s it! It’s a meditative art.

Just the mere act of winding up for the throw and letting a stone fly across the water and all is right in the world, like when you were a kid. No cares. No worries. No thoughts. Just you and the ripples on the water.

Talk about relaxing?!

You should try it sometime. Or, maybe pick it back up again if you’ve lost touch with your inner rock skipper. I’m sure you’ll find it very therapeutic as well.

And here! This will help get you started – a quick tutorial on skipping stones. I say, “Go for it!”

How many skips can you get?

See ya’ on the trail!

Kimsey Creek Crossings – Water, Water, Everywhere!

By and far, Kimsey Creek Trail offers the most diverse and dramatic landscapes within the

A fallen tree over the falls on Kimsey Creek.

Though tempting, this is NOT one of the recommended crossings over Kimsey Creek.

Standing Indian Basin. And water. Lots of water!

There’s water beside the trail, on the trail, across the trail, over the trail, under the trail, through the trail, running, pooling, trickling, splashing, sploshing and laughing. Oh, yes! It laughs at you at times as you try and keep your shoes dry.

But it’s all part of the charm, character, and personality of the trail. In fact, I wouldn’t want it any other way.

So, whether you walk right through the water, step across stones and logs, or perambulate over one of the many bridges, Kimsey Creek Trail in the Standing Indian Basin has a crossing for you.

Here are just a few you’ll encounter….

A feeder branch which flows into Kimsey Creek.

By the time you’re done you will have crossed dozens of these littler feeder branches to Kimsey Creek.

Nicely tucked within the thick rhododendron, a foot bridge crosses Kimsey Creek.

Looking downstream through the thick rhododendron at the first Kimsey Creek bridge.

The incredible blue blazed trail along the beautiful Kimsey Creek.

Paralleling the creek most of the way, Kimsey Creek Trail is filled with springs and low spots that never seem to dry out.


Water flowing down the middle of Kimsey Creek Trail.

Depending on the time of year, water occasionally flows down the middle of the trail, adding to the fun of hiking Kimsey Creek Trail.

Another foot bridge on Kimsey Creek Trail.

This is one of the many bold streams that feed into Kimsey Creek. As you will see, not all of them have bridges.


Weathered and well-trodden, this bridge crosses a feeder branch of Kimsey Creek.

Another view of the weathered, well-trodden bridge from the previous photo.

Though it may not look it, this bridge is strong and sturdy...and a great place to sit and look at the falls on Kimsey Creek.

Not only a great place to cross Kimsey Creek, it’s also a great place to sit and look at the falls. (And don’t let the missing planks intimidate you. It’s a sturdy bridge.)


Necessity has prompted many hikers to build makeshift bridges along Kimsey Creek Trail.

Made by trail maintainers or by hikers themselves, logs and strategically placed rocks assist hikers at many crossings and wet spots along Kimsey Creek Trail.


Never needing a bridge, my hiking buddy, Phyto, loves playing in the water along Kimsey Creek.

My hiking buddy, Phyto, never uses a bridge to cross Kimsey Creek. Lucky dog!


One of several bold streams that feed into Kimsey Creek, offering a nice spot to soak your feet.

Funny how the widest feeder stream doesn’t have a bridge. No worries! There’s a narrow spot just upstream that most people can jump…or get wet trying.

After passing through so much water, this is the last year-round feeder branch that flows into Kimsey Creek.

This is it! The trail heads uphill away from Kimsey Creek and water becomes somewhat scarce…unless you’re caught in a rainstorm, which is frequent in this part of the Nantahala Mountains.

So…you get the picture?! (See what I did there?) Kimsey Creek Trail is beautiful, full of gorgeous scenery, and wet, but wet in a good sort of way.

Take a hike, splash in the creek, or soak your feet. You can’t go wrong, anytime of the year, on Kimsey Creek Trail.

See ya’ on the trail!


Where In The Blue Blazes?

A snail slithering along the blue blazed Long Branch Trail.

Even snails use blue blaze trails.

To find your GAME* you can follow a blaze
that leads from south to north.
Or turn it around for a MEGA* trip
and follow it back to forth.

For this blaze of white makes one long line
for hikers of all types;
through tunnels of green, past waterfalls
and many beautiful sights.

But veer from the path, and you often will,
for water, rest, or ride,
there’s another blaze that you will need
whose importance we cannot hide

Nature encroaching on a blue blaze along Park Creek Trail.

Nature attempting to turn a blue blaze green.

Though not as famous as the white
this blue one is your friend.
It’ll be there in your hour of need
and follow you ‘til the end.

It’ll guide you to a warm, dry shelter
whenever you need to rest.
Or on a tangent to a view
that’s arguably the best.

And there for you when weather gets bad
an alternate route’s okay;
to lead you ‘round a mountain top
and safe from danger’s way

A source of information, this double blue blaze indicates a right turn in the trail.

This double blue blaze is indicating a right turn in the trail.

So never discount the power of blue
when hiking on the trail.
It’s just as important as the white
though certainly not as pale.

~Michael Byrd

See ya’ on the trail!

*GAME is an acronym for an AT thru-hike that goes from Georgia to Maine or Northbound and MEGA is for a Southbound trip from Maine to Georgia.

Earth Day Yoga Hike to Standing Indian Mountain

What could be better?! The day was clear and blue. The temperature was crisp and refreshing. And a gusty wind carried the scent of Spring in the air.

Hiking to Standing Indian Mountain for an Earth Day 2015 Yoga class.Earth Day 2015!! We were so fortunate this year. The weather around the mountains of western North Carolina is rather unpredictable in April; 70 degrees one day and snowing the next, but this Earth Day was the best one in recent memory.

And what better way to celebrate it than having a Yoga class on top of Standing Indian Mountain in the Nantahala National Forest?

Eight of us intrepid Yogis strapped on our day packs, filled with water and snacks, and hiked the 2.5 miles on the Appalachian Trail from Deep Gap to Standing Indian Mountain. It was a crowded day on the trail, filled with AT section hikers and thru-hikers making their way northbound. I counted 23 in all!Backwoods AT sign for the blue blazed trail to the top of Standing Indian Mountain.

Imagine their surprise when they stepped off the short blue blaze trail and into the small opening on Standing Indian with a bunch of yogis striking poses…and OM’ing? But that’s another story.

It took just over an hour to reach the top of the mountain. We weren’t in a rush; we had all day. Two of our Yogi’s, Bill and Sharon, being past presidents of the Nantahala Hiking Club, regaled us with AT stories, trail history, and an ongoing seminar on spring wildflowers. Very informative!

Stopping along the AT for a rest and a brief history lesson.And, Jean, a member of the Franklin Bird Club, offered her keen ear to help identify the calls of all the birds we could hear, but as nature would have that day, couldn’t see.

All in all, it was an amazing Earth Day watching Mother Nature awaken and start to redecorate her woodland mantle, with spring wildflowers.

Having the theme of Earth Day, our Yoga class consisted mostly of partner Yoga poses. Everyone was invited to explore their partnership with Mother Earth as they learned Yoga poses that relied on another person. Each pose honoring and expressing gratitude for all the things on Earth we take for granted.Holding Virabhadrasana I, or Warrior One Pose, atop Standing Indian Mountain, Earth Day 2015.

We finished our Yoga class back to back with our partners in a seated meditation. As we quieted our minds and our hearts, I invited everyone to see if they could sync their breath with their partner. Once they had accomplished this, I invited them to sync their rhythmic breath with the rhythm of their other partner, Mother Earth, as we gently sat on her shoulders.

Something magical happened on top of Standing Indian. After about 5 minutes of meditation there was a pause – a pause in the howling wind, a pause in the song of the birds, a pause in the Earth. For about 15 seconds nothing moved, nothing was making a sound. It was the quietest moment I’ve ever experienced.

Learning to work as a partner in Uktanasana, or Chair Pose.You could feel the stillness. You could touch the stillness. In that one moment we were connected to each other, to the Earth, and to something bigger than any of us collectively.

The whole purpose of Yoga is to connect to this Oneness and, speaking for myself, I’ve never felt anything like this before. Was it the day? Was it the people? Was it our intention? Was it being on the proverbial mountain top?

Or, maybe it was just a coincidence.

Who knows?! But…it happened.

Enjoying the view from Standing Indian on Earth Day 2015.

Though a little chilly, the sky was clear, the sun was out, and the view was amazing on Earth Day 2015.

And none of us will soon forget this experience. That’s for sure! And all the way back we talked about making this an annual thing; The Earth Day Yoga Hike.

Maybe you can join us next year? Or, if Earth Day doesn’t work for you, I’d be happy to lead you and your group on a Yoga Hike to Standing Indian or any other mountain top in western North Carolina. Think about. And let me know. Namaste.

See ya on the trail!